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to deal with him every week? and he has failed in foreign policy. what's the point of this whole thing? what's the point of this exercise? 'cause we know his real feelings. >> well, i certainly don't. look it, the president or foreign policy or our position with regard to the world and the way the world views us in the same way you do, sean, that's not going to be a big surprise, first of all, the palestinian-- >> suck up to the muslim world work? and he's-- >> i don't feel he did, i don't feel he did. >> sean: oh, stop, please. >> and i feel those were highlights that were distracting and we' are trivializing these issues. every president had problems besides bill clinton because israel does not want to establish a two-state solution and that's the-- >> and he said he was going to fix this and he wasn't able to. saying america was arrogant in cairo didn't work, did it, colonel west? >> well, sean, let's start with andrea mitchell over at msnbc, said this is the worst relationship she's seen and she's been covering since ronald reagan. and the first interview was al-arabi al-arabiya. a
schools of thought on how to deal with israel. mark perry is a foreign policy analyst who remains close contact with the hamas leadership. >> abu mazen has gambled very explicitly and said very explicitly that there will be no violence against israel and he will negotiate in good faith with israel. the problem is that hasn't gotten him anywhere. hamas has a totally different approach and their approach is resistant. they believe israel will only come to the table when they feel pain. >> warner: a bring number of palestinians see justification for that belief. last november a week of palestinian rocket fire from gaza and israeli air strikes led to an egyptian-brokered cease-fire between hamas and israel. as part of that, some israeli restrictions on gaza were eased. the year before, hamas secured the release of a thousand prisoners from israeli jails in return for handing over gilad shalit, the israeli soldier it kidnapped in 2006. >> it has sent a clear message to the palestinian people if you abduct soldiers the they will be released but if you sign agreements about w us about releasin
degree was running its own foreign policy. one of the big things we're looking to understand about ping's government over the next year or two is whether he can bring the pla under his control. he's already been head of the military commission which is really the most powerful role there. it took hu jintao a few years before he got named to that post. >> rose: david sanger thank you as always. >> thank you, charlie. >> we look at politics the republican and democratic party. the republican national committee comes in the way of political conference where republican leaders met to discuss the future of their party. report contained an endorsement of comprehensive immigration reform and extensive discussion of social issues. the gop has struggled to define itself since the loss in the 2012 presidential election. joining me to help me understand this from washington al lent fr boomberg view andark halperin from "time" magazine. i'm pleased to have both of them back on this program. i begin with this al. as you know i've been in rome watching the new pope be selected. so i've been there ge
-- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. and on foreign policy, they did not support the bush foreign policy, so the issues that made that republican party dominant, all three issues are in democratic favor. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter what network you have. economic conservatives and smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are weighing right now are do we need better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you look at the gay marriage issue, that is very generational
that was open to conservative views, particularly on foreign policy and some domestic issues. it was much more electric than at this time is now. now it is another liberal magazine. >> i want to show you an ad that was in the publication in 2007. well let's see if you remember this ad. on the screen, all aboard, enjoy seven days and night on the aalso can coast with your favorite weekly standard pundits, june 16-23, 200. special private programs and receptions. on and on. like-mind conservatives. what was the impact of that cruise on american politics? >> sure. well i think the discovery of sarah palin was one thing. on the cruise, we went up there in southern -- we were not up around anchorage in that part of alaska, but we were mr. we went to juno and so on. in juno, we were invited by the governor to have lunch at her house in the governor's mansion. he found out later this came about because the woman who was the head of the alaska federation of republican women or whatever the title is and had told the governor's space that we were coming and, at first, she was ignored. she told them agai
. >> dick cheney was a trained foreign policy expert. so was colin powell. >> indeed, the facts and iraq's behavior show that saddam hussein and his regime are concealing their efforts to produce more weapons of mass destruction. >> the national debate over going to war in iraq was heavily lopsided in favor of war. in the united states senate, the war resolution passed with 77 votes, only 23 senators opposed it, including only one republican rhode island senator rink on chafee. >> what concerns me most is the pattern we see applied to iraq, that is abandoning of our alliances and willing to be preemptive without any real evidence of weapons of mass destruction. >> in the house of representatives the war resolution passed with 296 votes. 133 house members voted against it, including a congresswoman from san francisco who was working her way up the leadership ladder. >> let's do what is proportionate, appropriate, which mitigates risk for our young people, another cost in addition to human lives, cost to terrorism and cost to the economy and another cost to our budget. this cost can be unl
that in that foreign policy matters, colin powell will be my chief adviser. i would think that would be a smart move. this is a decent fella who served this country well, and i think that would be, i mean if you are asking do i think he would be a great secretary of state? you bet. >> mr. barnes? >> that was good question. that was one of the better once i asked. >> what would you say today about colin powell? >> oh, well, who? george bush. >> yeah. >> he would probably say the same thing. certainly there is a rift between them over foreign policy and it opened up while powell was still his secretary of state. >> twitter. fred barnes is on twitter. why? >> my son has convinced me that i have to be on twitter. don't tweet much. but i tweet occasionally. i tweet maybe once a week, ebbs sent for my son nicely will tweet my articles. he sends those out. >> what does he do? >> my son worked for kevin mccarthy, the republican whip in the house of representatives and was, until recently, a floor assistant, the job he loved. >> all right. twitter. i will read some of the twitter messages that you sent out.
'll come back and talk more about that and what it meant fo american foreign policy going forward. we continue our discussion on this tenth anniversary of the iraqi war with the distinguished panel of people who observed and written about the war sinces beginning. from cambridge, glrngd john burns, the london bureau chief of the "new york times." in new york, michael gordon, chiefch military correspondent r the "new york times." fouad ajami, a senior fellow of the hoomp institution. dexter filkins of the "new yorker" we hope will be joining us shortly. i go back to michael gordon.ly tell me what the judgment of history will be about our participation in the iraqi war. >> i think too much attentionwa has been paid to the decision tc go to war and not enough on the management of the withdrawal from iraq and where we go from here with iraq. because the story of iraq is not over. and we shouldn't just put thisov chapter behind us and say we're done with it. there were opportunities to be engaged with iraq by the u.s. government on the level of common citizens. there's a tbalt for influenc
, and we saw a column earlier today from a senior member of the american foreign policy council and he's suggesting that the u.s. is less popular in the middle east now than it was at the end of president george w. bush's administration. let's debate that, bring in alan colmes, the host of the alan colmes show and ben ferguson, the most of the ben ferguson show. >> hi. >> alisyn: alan, what do you think of that premise. did candidate obama said he would help to elevate our status internationally after what he believed president bush had done and that our stature was no longer as high. do you think president obama has accomplished that? >> i do and i spent time looking at the polls and our standing worldwide and particularly in the muslim world is a little higher than at the end of the bush administration. one of the problems we have is the anti-islamic video that came out about a year ago and hurt us in pakistan and hurt us in many parts of the middle east and we also were hurt in pakistan by doing something which most of us applauded, going in and getting bin laden. so there are certa
now by two upstarts. lapid and bennett, both of whom are not focused in the main on foreign policy and security issues but on social and economicnes so it's a paradox, in order to maintain his relevance as a foreign policy national security guy-- which is his strong suit-- the fact is he does need a better relationship with obama because obama holds the key on that front, certainly on iran. >> reporter: speaking of iran-- and i'll come back to that relationship-- is what the president saided in an interview with israeli television, will that comfort israelis? >> it certainly should comfort israelis. after all, the record suggests that the administration has worked very, very hard on the iranian challenge and the president has said that take my word, we're not interested in containing iran, we're interested in preventing iran from developing nuclear technology. i think it should assuage israelis who are concerned about this issue i wonder why-- and this seems to be part of the conversation in washington-- that israelis need an american president to show some deep emotional attachmen
me, joe, is that acceptable foreign policy in your mind? >> sean, look the prime minister of israel and bill clinton met at camp david with-- >> was he a terrorist. >> you can't do-- it doesn't matter whether he was or not. you have to deal with-- if you're going to have peace you have to work with both parties. you don't have to like both parties, but. >> sean: cover up the cross, but speak under a picture of arafat. >> we were meeting with abbas' on their turf, in their presidential arena and you come-- if you come to the white house, if you come to the white house and meet with our president and you don't like the fact that george washington is sitting over a desk-- >> george washington isn't a terrorist. and wait, i have a question. >> the british probably thought he was. >> sean: was he a terrorist? >> of course he was. >> sean: thank you, thank you. but the british probably thought that george washington was a terrorist. >> sean: if i was president, billy cunningham, i wouldn't speak under a picture of a terrorist. >> sean hannity we wondered what a second jimmy carter term wo
, and what it means for american foreign policy.me joining me is michael gordon.jo he is chief military correspondent for the "new york times." his new book is called "end game: theis inside story of the struggle for iraq." i am pleased to have him here back a this table. welcome. good to see you. >> glad to be here. >> rose: this is, many are say, the detailed history from t the military point of view of the iraqi war. is that a fair assessment? >> well, it-- i started out to do, that but actually, i did a little more than that in this sense-- i had a coauthor, general trainer -- a >> who you worked with before. >> i started out to do a book on the surge which i had covered before the surge, during the surge, and after the surge, onng the ground inraq, and i concluded you couldn't really evaluate the surge until youal knew what was policy was before the surge and you couldn't evaluate whether the surge worked or didn't until you found out what happened afterwards. it became kind of a political military. and one thing i did try to do which a lot of american authors haven't done, frankl
and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
years. the president spoke out on that amidst all the other busy stuff he was doing on foreign policy this week. and he said even after nearly two and a half years, a minority of senators continued to block a simple up or down vote on her nomination. the d.c. circuit has more vacancies than any other appeals court. yet we know this doesn't get a lot of attention. do you think there is any. >> to put more pressure on this do nothing congress? >> it is unlikely she will come back up. what is happening here is that this is part of the conservative cause on judicial nominations. they're made about what happened during the bush years when democrats blocked a landful of very conservative judicial nominees. in some respects, this might be payback. what could obama do? he can try another couple of judicial nominations. the bottom line is he needs to clear these judicial nominations with at least a handful of republicans. otherwise if they're too liberal, they will get filibustered. >> thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> up next, a huge week ahead for gay rights as the supremes take up two
. and susan glasser, executive editor of "foreign policy" magazine. it seems as john kerry hop scotchs around the region, all he is encountering are rocks and hard places. am i right? >> yes, you are right about that. i mean, this is a region i think that actually has been crying out for a bit more u.s. engagement, but that doesn't mean that it's going to be easy. the secretary kerry clearly shows he's ready to be engaged but, you know, he's walking into a situation in iraq where the united states has already withdrawn its troops in afghanistan where we're in the process, and that means we are diminishing influence in both of those places. we still have interests there but diminishing influence. syria, a very, very hot conflict. the united states has been reluctant to get more involved, and then... and iran, of course, difficult negotiations with, you know, not necessarily any sign of progress. and then on top of all of that, secretary kerry has shown that he wants to take on the israeli-palestinian issue and see if he can make progress where others have not. >> ifill: what does his schedule,
indyk who joins us from washington where he is the vice president and director for foreign policy at the brookings institution. ambassador indyk, good to have you back on the program, sir. >> thanks, tavis, good to be with you. tavis: i guess the start is whether or not i have overstated the case. there are some who believe as i intimated a moment ago that the president's very presence in israel that's to say, our president, barack obama, signals to some there might be renewed vigor, renewed possibility for peace between the israelis and palestinians and there are many more others, perhaps, as i read, who think it's a false hope, that the expectations on this need to be tamped down. where does ambassador indyk stand? >> certainly the white house has been trying to tamp down those expectations, including the president himself. he's going early in his second term, just a couple of days after the israeli government has been sworn in after their elections, so it's very hard to see what exactly could be done on this trip to
time ago to martin and dick, now director of the foreign-policy at brookings institution. for coming in. very cordial between the two men. do you think real differences remain between them over iran? but there are inevitably some differences between israel, a small country in iran posing neighborhood, and the united states, which has more than 1000 nuclear weapons in its arsenal. iran is not about to attack the united states. having said that, the president has put out a timeline of a year. mr. netanyahu has not contradicted him. and i do not think he wanted to show any difference during this visit, for sure. he does not want any daylight to show between the president and prime minister. but nevertheless, i think he has said i think it twice publicly and that allows the negotiation to be tested. >> president obama stressed resolving it diplomatically and mr. netanyahu talk about israel have been the right to independently defend itself. you think that is not necessarily conflict between those two positions? necessarily. the president said israel has the right to defend itself. his respo
on foreign relations and author of "foreign policy begins at home." richard, thank you for joining me. although it seems to have been a successful trip for relations with israel has it done much to nudge the peace process forward? >> it's in some ways set the foundation or provided a context. i've been a diplomat before and there are times you can do peace plans, times situationes are right for specific proposals. this is not one of them. this was a trip to go over the head of the israeli government, to build a context of support. once that context exists then it makes it less date for the israeli government to dom to a negotiating table and put kids forward. the same logic applies to the palestinian side. this is a pre-negotiating trip. >> do you think he comes back with the stage set where he's prepared to invest his own political capital and get the peace process going? >> i think it's probably too oon to get that decision but great deal and turkey, was brought around with concerns about iran, the fear of syria. now you've had a rejew -- renewed strategic alignment between those tw
big dinners as secretary of state, in addition to all of the foreign policy personalities, there were always a few big donors who were sprinkled in and they won't forget it when it comes time in 2015 to begin. chris: hosting a show from berlin, from germany, another event given at the state department with her supporters and the obama supporters was at the white house, you're right. >> she is good at keeping that large group of people who would support her campaign involved, interested, and potentially ready to go. chris: anybody think she is not running? that's it, you just heard it, when we come back, "scoops and [ boy 1 ] hey! that's the last crescent. oh, did you want it? yea we'll split it. [ female announcer ] made fresh, so light, buttery and flakey. that's half that's not half! guys, i have more! thanks mom [ female announcer ] pillsbury crescents. let the making begin here's a better idea. pillsbury grands! flaky layers biscuits in just 15 minutes the light delicate layers add a layer of warmth to your next dinner. pillsbury grands biscuits let the making begin. chris: welcom
, in addition to all of the foreign policy personalities, there were always a few big donors who were sprinkled in and they won't forget it when it comes time in 2015 to begin. chris: hosting a show from berlin, from germany, another event given at the state department with her supporters and the obama supporters was at the white house, you're right. >> she is good at keeping that large group of people who would support her campaign involved, interested, and potentially ready to go. chris: anybody think she is not running? that's it, you just heard it, when we come back, "scoops and chris: welcome back. david, tell me something i don't know. >> the united states has been secretly training syrian rebel forces in jordan, but there is one big problem. the syrian rebels don't want to leave syria to get the training, which means that to make this program work, it's a good program, the u.s. is going to have to go inside syria. chris: ok. >> wow, that's good. i can't top that. as you know, the g.o.p. has conducted an auto autopsy to try to figure out what happened in the last election. all they have d
. obama has the right answers to foreign policy challenges around the world. and our power player of the week. a celebrity chef combines the classic with the cutting edge. all right now on "fox news sunday." >> chris: hello again and happy st. patrick's day from fox news in washington. the president met with republicans and democrats in both the house and senate this week. but for all of the talk of a grand bar gain there was no sign the two parties are any closer to bridging the divide over our nation's debt. we want to discuss the chances for a deal with two key senators. dick durbin the senate's number two democrat joins us from chicago. tennessee republican bob corker is in chattanooga. gentlemen, while the president was meeting with members of congress, house republicans and senate democrats put out their budget plans which had dramatic differences. let's take a look at them. the gop plan would cut the deficit $4.6 trillion over ten years, all through spending cuts. the democratic plan would cut the deficit $1.8 trillion half through spending cuts and half through tax hikes.
for the opposite. >> i would argue that a more restrained policy is the true conservative foreign policy as it includes two tenants of true conservatism. respect and fiscal discipline. instead of large land wars, we would, when necessary, target our enemy and strike with lethal force. >> when it comes to watching change shift, think about national security. national security was at the heart and soul of the republican party at least for about a generation and a half and democrats owned the national security issue for years. republican his to rely on general in order to gain credibility on foreign policy issues in the 50s. it took the vietnam war and then the iran hostage situation for democrats to lose that. republicans and bush and iraq lost that and it hurt the party and still hasn't recovered ever since. lots of people lost lives. the political impact is something that history should not ignore in this country. mr. russert, back to you. i will see you live tomorrow. >> thank you, chuck. this friday catch the msnbc documentary hubris: selling the iraq war, with our own rachel maddow. f
on the syria situation and other foreign policy challenges. joining me tonight is the chairman of the house intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers. mr. chairman, thank you for being here. >> thank you for having me. >> bret: let's start in syria. what do we know about the possibility of chemical weapons being used there? >> if you take the whole body of work, from the intelligence reports over the last two years, i believe it's highly probable that chemical weapons were used at least in some small amounts in syria. which is in violation of the chemical weapons convention. >> bret: now, foreign policy magazine, they have this quote. syrian support group, s.s.g., the only american organization licensed by the u.s. government to send money directly to the fsa, which is on the ground in syria, issued a press release yesterday claiming the gas that killed civilians in separate instances, two separate instances near me das cuss was a chemical agent similarlant found -- schismlant found in pesticide. it causes similar effects like muscle, nerve, respiratory death. >> do you believe it's t
fundamental, important foreign policy issues that you do not do at 3:00 o'clock in the morning and change the dynamics of the middle east, change the dynamics of our national security and interest. >> but is this business as usual from now on in washington? coming up, we will dissect what some are calling a, quote, carnival stage of the u.s. government. rick? >> all right. from the carnival to the weather. spring is here officially. but for millions of americans, it feels more like winter is not going away. the snow continues to fall in parts of colorado. it's part of the storm in the midwest. it could drop a foot of snow in some areas. and this storm system is on the move. it could create some serious travel problems all the way to those of us here in the northeast. meteorologist janis dean live with more. >> it's nice to see you. i'm sorry i'm delivering the bad news. >> that's okay. >> for a lot of folks, unfortunately. millions of people could be seeing another winter storm. let's take a look at it. there is our satellite imagery. heavy snow into kansas city. a warm side of the storm
that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i think the days are becoming mow desperate. the regime is more desperate. we know where the chemical weapons are. there's no secret that they are there. i think the probabilities are very high that we are going into some very dark times and i think the white house needs to be prepared. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need that final verification but given everything we know over t
spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here are the numbers -- host: send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. we will get to your phone calls in just a minute. is the us from baghdad pentagon correspondent for the washington post. begin with your headline this morning. at least 60 are killed in iraq on tuesday. what happened, and is this a pattern? guest: it has been the deadliest day since u.s. troops have pulled out. an al qaeda group took responsibility for this wave of bombings, and said it was doing so to seek revenge from the government. hearing si
there was a role in america's foreign policy. he wants america to pull back. he pointed to a split within the republican party on national security before almost anybody else did. he really actually outlined some of the divisions. when you look at his policies what he stands for, abolishing the departments of education, commerce, trade, the federal reserve. i think when he gets more out there in the public, when he's not just giving a talk at cpac, i just think that what he says is going to be too extreme for members of the republican party who support still the hawkish line of american involvement in the world and i think for clearly when he gets into i think into middle america, for running for anything like a presidential nomination that would be a very tricky position, some of those domestic issues, too. >> eugene, this is coming at a time that the gop is trying to reconfigure, the autopsy, what do you do to a corpse to bring it back to life? there are specific policy recommendations, raines preeb is's document. one was about gay marriage and one was about immigration. how do you move
the timelines regarding iran? in covering the pentagon and foreign policy. elizabeth, you know we have a different u.s. officials have a different notion of when we reach that danger point. the testimony last week was that the ayatollah has still not made the political decision to proceed with nuclear weapons. there's not that same sense at all in israel. >> i feel like i've been talking about this for years. the different timelines. but yes, there's still a different timeline that the u.s., i think the last thing the president said was about a year, israel thinks it's sooner than that. the reality is that israel is going to be in a very difficult position to do a strike itself. we've been through that many times it doesn't have the same capabilities the united states does and the united states is it going to wait until the last possible minute there was a lot of fighting last fall as you remember, about the president not being strong enough, against on iran. that has died down. there's a new israeli government and it's a little bit more moderate. so we're still in the same place. >> a
has been crossed. and graham tell s "foreign policy's" josh rogen, we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapon sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. what's your reaction to today's developments? >> well, if these reports are corroborated, martin, clearly the situation in syria, which you know you and i have talked about for at least two years, it indicates that, and as we all know, these weapons are not under lock and key. i had revealed in a piece that, indeed, they had been put under control of the besiege and elements of the iranians, revolutionary guards for safekeeping. given the fact hezbollah and any number of terrorist organizations are lurking around one corner or the next of any syrian city, who knows what's going on there. there's no guarantee anyone has control over these weapons. the fact of the matter is putting boots on the ground at this point is not going to solve the problem of where these wmd stockpiles go. >> dana, this has an eerie echo of that other despotic leader, saddam hussein, who used chemical weapons
runs the entire foreign-policy apparatus in the united states. it really does seem that i used to work for robert novak and he is to say a reporter is someone who's sells his soul for a good story but it turns out in the story might make iraq a bum look his presidency look like a failure, the reporter suddenly uses a lot of intellectual curiosity. .. >> we were practically the only ones to write about it. in some cases, the only one. people seem unaware. everyone is aware that the economy is kind of lacking. but obama has already been able to make the argument that we are turning the corner and we can do what we can. people don't believe that there is suppression for people your age or my page today. that group has not regained a single job since the recession ended. do not blame obama for the crisis. look at what happened since june 2009. there are fewer of us working today than there were in 1997. in all of the jobs being recovered are being taken by people 55 years old and older. i can find exactly one story at least recognizes the job recoveries. but the fact that young people have
the significance of this visit and what it means for u.s. foreign policy moving forward. when we come back, the water cooler watching democracy at its finest. another political brawl in the ukrainian parliament. we have diving and fighting in the parliament. more details when "way too early" comes back. max and penny kept our bookstore exciting and would always come to my rescue. but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so i switched to purina cat chow healthy weight formula. i just fed the recommended amount... and they both loved the taste. after a few months max's "special powers" returned... and i got my hero back. purina cat chow healthy weight. >>> all right. time for the water cooler. democracy in action. ukrainian style. check it out in the parliament yesterday. where is it going to start? always looking for where it's going to start. push, push, push. just a melee breaks out. fistacuffs. somebody obviously spoke russian and they want to speak ukrainian. there was nearly an identical brawl back in decem
: julie senator graham says this is quote, an exhibit a of a failed foreign policy and this is why the president allegedly doesn't want the people to come forward. bin laden is on the run, and al-qaeda is alive and well and benghazi, and how the people were allegedly begging for help. and we know that about the ambassador and apparently these people would back up-- >> and senator graham has to create the anti-obama to-- that's not what it's about at all. >> i would caution you and say this, senator graham can allege what it wants and white house can allege what it wants. the more lessons drawn from this the better. the more testimony from congress is the better. and if it's done privately without jeopardizing the covert operatives i'm for it. instead of trotting out on the sunday talk shows where senator graham is trying to burnish his bona fides, as opposed to going out there and-- >> how much more can he do? >> he can't prove this? >> senator graham is a whistle blower. >> he can't proof anything. >> he's to get what he's entitled to. the president doesn't seem to honor or respec
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
's development a schism in the foreign policy and mitt romney would indeed lead us down the road to another catastrophic, this time with iran. >> having been there while it was going so wrong, seeing it up close, when you think about our governance, do you think there's something that we can do now as a country to try to make it right, to fix the harm we did to ourselves as a country, not just politically. is there any kind of way we can fix the strategic error of that war internally and internationally? >> i think it boils down to the american people. i would like to say there's institutional change we could make statutorily or otherwise. i would like to say that we could elect different people. i would like to say all manner of things that would be easier to do, but i think the bottom line is the american people have got to get angry and they've got to start doing things, local things, state things, national things, whatever they can find or think to do. i was in great neck, new york, talking to a synagogue group this last weekend, and i'll tell you that all those people were war weary an
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